Adacado For Executives

Grow your business
with dynamic creative

Is your agency thriving? Are sales just surviving? Meet our friend Greg – a veteran of the advertising game, and CEO of a mid-sized ad agency, determined to boost the bottom line. Click below to meet Greg.

picture of a man walking and reading

Happy staff, happy clients

As Sir Branson once said, “If you take care of your employees, they will take care of the clients”. Adacado is quick to learn, easy to use, and in an industry of migraine-inducing software, actually kinda fun.

  • Library of pre-built ad themes
  • Dedicated support staff
  • Thorough tutorials and support docs

Rewards without the risk

No build fees, no costly commitments. Try out Dynamic Creative with your existing accounts, no matter how small, for the cost of a coffee and chocolate croissant. Building a new revenue stream has never tasted so good.

increasing ad results

Built to scale

Without getting too techy, our system is built so there’s no difference in performance between running one ad and running millions. And the more ads you run, the less you pay.

  • Blazing fast data processing
  • Agency-level /Enterprise level pricing tiers
person stacking up building blocks

Commitment-free pricing

If it ain’t working, call it quits. But when you change your mind a week later, start back up like you never stopped. It’s like a junior-high romance, but without the heartbreak or acne.

  • No build fees
  • Daily prorated pricing
  • No monthly commitment
two people high-fiving

Pricing starts at $10 US/day

with no monthly commitments or cancellation fees.

It’s budget-friendly dynamic creative.

A story of business growth with Adacado

picture of a man walking and reading

Tranquility at last...

The thick smell of coconut-scented sunscreen lathered on each of the still, lethargic bodies on the beach cuts through the salty ocean air. At a cool 90 degrees in the shade, Greg hasn’t felt this relaxed in months; maybe even years. He reaches for another sip of his fresco de frutas; still 10 days left in this Costa-Rican paradise. After so many months of unrelenting work, it was time to step back and relax. But as relaxed as he is, something is missing.

Farther down the beach, he sees a man pacing back and forth, talking on his cell phone. Over the crashing of the waves, he hears words like merger, and acquisition. “That’s what it is,” nods Greg, “I miss the grind.” 

He had promised his wife this trip would be work-free, but maybe a bit of research would help fill the void. Not research, light reading. Light, industry-specific reading.” He puts down the drink and reaches for his laptop-

“Greg. What are the rules?”

“Dammit Carol I just want to read. Can’t a man read on vacation?” his wife knows exactly what he is doing. She says nothing more, but her pursed lips and furrowed brow speak volumes.

“No emails, I promise.” He opens up his laptop. That’s better. Vacation is great, but work, well work is better. No emails, just light industry-specific reading.

He opens BNN, Business Insider, New York Times, the usual suspects. From a quick glance, nothing piques his curiosity. But he does notice The term Dynamic Creative a few times. Would you look at that. DCO again. He had a DCO vendor years ago that went bankrupt right at the moment of a big launch. Out of curiosity and slight narcissism, he clicks on one of the blog links. Scanning the blog, he realizes this is more of a “what is DCO” type article. Nothing new here... though it does seem things have improved since last time. Oh well, Carol is giving him glares, maybe it’s time to shut the laptop and get back to the task at hand - relaxing. 

A few weeks and many cervezas later, Greg is back in the office. Things have been trucking along without him, but now it’s time to start building some momentum again.

Sales are steady; no peaks and valleys in the reports. But Greg is always looking ahead, and knows that ‘good’ is just short for good enough. Soon ‘good enough’ will turn to ‘enough,’ which is short for ‘not good enough’. We’ve been successful doing X, but it doesn’t mean we’ll BE successful doing X.

Time to make a few calls.

He thinks back to the article he read from the beach. Maybe there’s something to this DCO thing.

He delicately types the following into the search bar “simple dynamic creative.” The first hit is for Adacado. They’re still around? Aren’t they all custom solutions? The page title is ‘ad creative made easy’ - let’s hope they mean it.

To Greg, personal relationships are everything. If he can’t enjoy a round of golf with someone and still get along by the 18th green, no deal. This phone call matters.

A friendly voice says hello on the other end.

“How the hell are ya. Greg Stamps here, CEO of Stamps media inc.”

“Thanks for calling Greg, I’m doing great. We’re finally into summer weather here in Vancouver, and the city has come alive. How about yourself?”

Greg appreciates the friendliness. Never start a call with business; that’s the rule. He recounts the tales of his time in the sun in Costa Rica, and of transitioning back into the mania of downtown Philadelphia. As he talks, he notices there is no rush or urgency. The rep is just happy to chat. That’s a good sign.

“Now down to business. I’ll be frank with you, I haven’t had a good experience with DCO in the past. In fact I lost a boatload of cash. So I’m hesitant to jump back on board with this.”

“No problem, Greg. I think you’ll find the way we do things is quite a bit different than in years past. Though I’m curious to know what made you call today? If your past experience with DCO was so negative, I want to be sure I can offer something of real value to you, and not repeat any bad experiences.”

This guy seems to get it. Trustworthy, easy-going, not a pushy salesman just looking for a commission. Greg mentions the article he saw, and how it seemed things have changed.

They continue to chat about the industry, DCO, latin-american street food, the works. It’s nearing lunch-time, so Greg goes to sign off. The rep mentions a few articles he’ll send that might help out. And that he’s happy to schedule a product demo any time to really solidify what they’re discussing.

Greg thanks him for his time, but says no to the demo. He’s not ready for that level of commitment. Before leaving for lunch, he sees an email already arrive with 4 different articles, a pitch video, and a keynote presentation from one of the engineers. These guys know what they’re doing. Still need to build up that trust though...

The next few weeks are packed with client meetings. Too much going on to think about anything else. Though once in a while, Greg gets a quick email from Adacado - with links to informative articles, case studies, and product updates. Looks like their clients are hitting some home runs. And the product is growing constantly. New features are being released every week. Another good sign.

After another few weeks of the occasional email and voicemail, he schedules a demo and blocks off a few hours (that’s how long these things tend to take) on Wednesday at 1.

The call starts great - more chat about summer weather and vacations. The conversation naturally flows into the actual presentation. It begins with a bit of a history of advertising. Greg loves this, because he’s seen so many of the changes in his career. He begins to smile and nod along. Connection. The presentation naturally flows into the demonstration of the product. 4 minutes. Excuse me?

Greg is a bit taken aback. It’s 1:22. And we’re done. That was too easy. We must have missed something. This was undoubtedly the happy path of the product, but what about mocks? Data processing? XML? All that annoying Dynamic Creative stuff? Greg knows there must be something missing. He’ll need to actually use the darn thing so he can investigate.

The rep sends him a link to create an account and start building campaigns. That solves that.

The next few weeks involve Greg trying out the platform, emailing back and forth, and the occasional phone call. He feels the product is worth implementing, but he needs to solidify things personally first.

It’s been over 2 months since that first phone call, but he’s ready to pull the trigger. The only problem, training. He’s not too technical, and there’s no way he’s going to try and relay all this information to each of his agents.

The rep sends over a link to a series of videos. All walk-throughs of how to use the product, as well as best practices for selling to your clients, and getting the most out of the product. They even have a template of how to on-board employees and clients onto the platform. Absolutely perfect. These guys get it - if Adacado helps us make more money, they’ll make more money at the same time. Financial symbiosis.

Credit card info is in, company memo is sent, and some Costa-Rican hot sauce is being shipped to the Adacado rep as thanks for all his time. All the boxes are checked, t’s are crossed and i’s dotted. Would you look at that; tranquility, again.

A story of business growth with Adacado

picture of a man walking and reading

Tranquility at last...

The thick smell of coconut-scented sunscreen lathered on each of the still, lethargic bodies on the beach cuts through the salty ocean air. At a cool 90 degrees in the shade, Greg hasn’t felt this relaxed in months; maybe even years. He reaches for another sip of his fresco de frutas; still 10 days left in this Costa-Rican paradise. After so many months of unrelenting work, it was time to step back and relax. But as relaxed as he is, something is missing.

Farther down the beach, he sees a man pacing back and forth, talking on his cell phone. Over the crashing of the waves, he hears words like merger, and acquisition. “That’s what it is,” nods Greg, “I miss the grind.” 

He had promised his wife this trip would be work-free, but maybe a bit of research would help fill the void. Not research, light reading. Light, industry-specific reading.” He puts down the drink and reaches for his laptop-

“Greg. What are the rules?”

“Dammit Carol I just want to read. Can’t a man read on vacation?” his wife knows exactly what he is doing. She says nothing more, but her pursed lips and furrowed brow speak volumes.

“No emails, I promise.” He opens up his laptop. That’s better. Vacation is great, but work, well work is better. No emails, just light industry-specific reading.

He opens BNN, Business Insider, New York Times, the usual suspects. From a quick glance, nothing piques his curiosity. But he does notice The term Dynamic Creative a few times. Would you look at that. DCO again. He had a DCO vendor years ago that went bankrupt right at the moment of a big launch. Out of curiosity and slight narcissism, he clicks on one of the blog links. Scanning the blog, he realizes this is more of a “what is DCO” type article. Nothing new here... though it does seem things have improved since last time. Oh well, Carol is giving him glares, maybe it’s time to shut the laptop and get back to the task at hand - relaxing. 

A few weeks and many cervezas later, Greg is back in the office. Things have been trucking along without him, but now it’s time to start building some momentum again.

Sales are steady; no peaks and valleys in the reports. But Greg is always looking ahead, and knows that ‘good’ is just short for good enough. Soon ‘good enough’ will turn to ‘enough,’ which is short for ‘not good enough’. We’ve been successful doing X, but it doesn’t mean we’ll BE successful doing X.

Time to make a few calls.

He thinks back to the article he read from the beach. Maybe there’s something to this DCO thing.

He delicately types the following into the search bar “simple dynamic creative.” The first hit is for Adacado. They’re still around? Aren’t they all custom solutions? The page title is ‘ad creative made easy’ - let’s hope they mean it.

To Greg, personal relationships are everything. If he can’t enjoy a round of golf with someone and still get along by the 18th green, no deal. This phone call matters.

A friendly voice says hello on the other end.

“How the hell are ya. Greg Stamps here, CEO of Stamps media inc.”

“Thanks for calling Greg, I’m doing great. We’re finally into summer weather here in Vancouver, and the city has come alive. How about yourself?”

Greg appreciates the friendliness. Never start a call with business; that’s the rule. He recounts the tales of his time in the sun in Costa Rica, and of transitioning back into the mania of downtown Philadelphia. As he talks, he notices there is no rush or urgency. The rep is just happy to chat. That’s a good sign.

“Now down to business. I’ll be frank with you, I haven’t had a good experience with DCO in the past. In fact I lost a boatload of cash. So I’m hesitant to jump back on board with this.”

“No problem, Greg. I think you’ll find the way we do things is quite a bit different than in years past. Though I’m curious to know what made you call today? If your past experience with DCO was so negative, I want to be sure I can offer something of real value to you, and not repeat any bad experiences.”

This guy seems to get it. Trustworthy, easy-going, not a pushy salesman just looking for a commission. Greg mentions the article he saw, and how it seemed things have changed.

They continue to chat about the industry, DCO, latin-american street food, the works. It’s nearing lunch-time, so Greg goes to sign off. The rep mentions a few articles he’ll send that might help out. And that he’s happy to schedule a product demo any time to really solidify what they’re discussing.

Greg thanks him for his time, but says no to the demo. He’s not ready for that level of commitment. Before leaving for lunch, he sees an email already arrive with 4 different articles, a pitch video, and a keynote presentation from one of the engineers. These guys know what they’re doing. Still need to build up that trust though...

The next few weeks are packed with client meetings. Too much going on to think about anything else. Though once in a while, Greg gets a quick email from Adacado - with links to informative articles, case studies, and product updates. Looks like their clients are hitting some home runs. And the product is growing constantly. New features are being released every week. Another good sign.

After another few weeks of the occasional email and voicemail, he schedules a demo and blocks off a few hours (that’s how long these things tend to take) on Wednesday at 1.

The call starts great - more chat about summer weather and vacations. The conversation naturally flows into the actual presentation. It begins with a bit of a history of advertising. Greg loves this, because he’s seen so many of the changes in his career. He begins to smile and nod along. Connection. The presentation naturally flows into the demonstration of the product. 4 minutes. Excuse me?

Greg is a bit taken aback. It’s 1:22. And we’re done. That was too easy. We must have missed something. This was undoubtedly the happy path of the product, but what about mocks? Data processing? XML? All that annoying Dynamic Creative stuff? Greg knows there must be something missing. He’ll need to actually use the darn thing so he can investigate.

The rep sends him a link to create an account and start building campaigns. That solves that.

The next few weeks involve Greg trying out the platform, emailing back and forth, and the occasional phone call. He feels the product is worth implementing, but he needs to solidify things personally first.

It’s been over 2 months since that first phone call, but he’s ready to pull the trigger. The only problem, training. He’s not too technical, and there’s no way he’s going to try and relay all this information to each of his agents.

The rep sends over a link to a series of videos. All walk-throughs of how to use the product, as well as best practices for selling to your clients, and getting the most out of the product. They even have a template of how to on-board employees and clients onto the platform. Absolutely perfect. These guys get it - if Adacado helps us make more money, they’ll make more money at the same time. Financial symbiosis.

Credit card info is in, company memo is sent, and some Costa-Rican hot sauce is being shipped to the Adacado rep as thanks for all his time. All the boxes are checked, t’s are crossed and i’s dotted. Would you look at that; tranquility, again.