Adacado For AdOps

Your dynamic creative operations station

If you’re like most AdOps gurus, you’ve got a lot on your plate. And if you’re anything like our friend Lynda, you’re looking for something to make life a little easier. Click here to meet Lynda.

Your dynamic creative operations station

If you’re like most AdOps gurus, you’ve got a lot on your plate. And if you’re anything like our friend Lynda, you’re looking for something to make life a little easier. Click here to meet Lynda.

Build campaigns fast

Design, build, and launch a Dynamic Creative ad campaign in minutes with the Adacado campaign builder. It’s ad creative done at lightning speed. And lightning is faster than thunder.

  • Pre-built ad themes
  • Campaign activity dashboard
  • Auto-generated AdTags

Design, or don't

Use our library of ad themes to build campaigns fast. Or start from scratch – and design, and upload, and drag and drop to your heart’s content. It’s Dynamic Creative – we had to include the Creative somewhere.

  • Library of pre-built ad themes
  • Custom theme designer

Tech-wizards not required

No code, no problem. Adacado handles the tech stuff, so you can stick to the fun stuff. Like convincing your client that AdTag isn’t just a game you play in the office…

  • Auto-generated tracking pixel
  • DSP-friendly AdTags
  • Activity reports

Bring it all together

All your accounts, campaigns, and designs, neatly organized and tucked away in a single dashboard. Yes Ms. Kondo, Adacado does spark joy.

  • Organize campaigns by advertiser
  • Campaign activity dashboard
  • Data processed in the background

Pricing starts at $10 US/day

with no monthly commitments or cancellation fees.

It’s budget-friendly dynamic creative.

Wednesday, 2:44pm. Overcast skies. Lentement Advertising’s coffee machine is out of coffee. The facilities people come on Thursdays to stock the coffee machine. Today is Wednesday.

Lynda has been with Lentement Advertising LLC. for 8 years now. She manages AdOps, reports to the VP of sales, and has a team of 8 working for her. 3 of her team are fairly new, because 3 of her team recently quit. She doesn’t know why. She heard something from HR about workplace culture. To Lynda, free, unlimited coffee is quite the perk - not many workplaces have such a generous culture. The facilities people come on Thursdays to stock the coffee machine. Today is Wednesday.

The company’s numbers are down. Again. Clients seem happy, but campaigns are stagnating and accounts are slowly dropping off.

The CEO has issued an ultimatum to the company; if numbers don’t go back up asap, a ‘restructuring’ will be necessary. That doesn’t sound good.

Her boss messages her that he’s worried about the AdOps team. Things are moving too slowly and accounts are leaving because of it. He’s asked Lynda to review her processes and find a solution to increase productivity and customer satisfaction. She’s been doing this so long that she feels she’s exhausted every possibility; she knows what works, and what doesn’t. It’s the clients’ fault that numbers are down - they’re indecisive and take too long to respond. There’s nothing wrong with what she’s doing, after all…

She checks her email. Questions from her team, messages from HR, emails from disgruntled clients - nothing that needs addressing right away - and one from a company called Adacado. She remembers them, they’re the ones who lost the DELL contract years ago. She deletes the email. DCO? No thanks, not for my clients. They’re happy with what they’ve got. 3:15 - break time.

A week goes by; it’s Wednesday and the coffee machine has run out of coffee again. The phone rings, it’s Adacado. I’ll call them back, she thinks, I have more important things to do. She begins writing a memo to the office manager, requesting larger quantities of coffee beans be loaded into the machine each week. She’ll need to calculate the estimated budget for this official proposal, so she books off the rest of her day to take care of that. Can’t rush the process. Process is everything.

The next week, she receives another email from this person at Adacado wanting to set up a demo. Lynda needs something to report to her boss, so she agrees and books a call. It’s likely a waste of time, but it should make the boss happy.

The call goes fine. It was shorter than expected, and quite easy to follow. But Lynda hates sales people. Now it’s time to draft a report for her boss on why using Adacado’s technology will help them increase profits. But it probably won’t.

She drafts up the basics; who the company is, what they do, how they do it, etc. But she needs cold hard stats. She emails the rep and asks for material to help her make a case for it. It’s 3:15; she turns her computer off and goes to the kitchen-area to get a coffee.

3:29, and she’s meandering back to her desk. She turns her computer on and sees an email from that same Adacado rep. It seems the website has all the information necessary. There’s a series of links to case studies, brands they work with, etc. There’s also a pdf file with all that info in it. That’s better. She can print a pdf file, she can’t print a website. This is advertising; print is better.

She reads through the case studies. ROAS up 2000% - that must be a typo. She writes in 200% - that’s better. NBA, Mercedes, impressive. Sojern - that’s interesting. Lentement has quite a few clients in hospitality… There’s a breakdown of exactly what was done with the Sojern campaign to get such impressive results. 2000 again, maybe it wasn’t a typo? 

The next week (you can’t rush these things, after all) she emails again asking for clarification on pricing. The rep responds with another link to the pricing page, but also a pdf file with the pricing. Perfect. This is alarmingly affordable, she thinks. Some of her smaller clients could actually use this, and maybe they could reduce margins with her bigger clients. No build fees - does that mean happier clients, or just less profit?

In that same email is a link to a blog post titled “How to sell DCO to existing clients with Adacado.” Interesting, that’s exactly what she was considering. Blog posts can be printed, so she prints that too.

She’s finally ready to present her case to the boss, so she books 2 hours with her boss to go over her report. He responds with a short message “Lynda, I don’t have 2 hours to review a 75 page report. Just send me some links to the website, pricing, whatever you think would be helpful. I trust you, I’ll review it myself. We’re all too busy to be spending time on lengthy reports.”

Process! What about process? Biting her lip, she compiles all the links that the rep sent in an unformatted email, and sends it, without even including her signature. That’ll show him.

A few days later she gets a message “Lynda, great work. I think this could be great for us. I looked at their site, and saw how easy it is to get started, how many customer testimonials and stats they have - and that article about how to sell DCO to existing clients! Talk about making it easy for us! No-brainer! Don’t know how you found these guys, but way to go. Get half your team using it right away to if it’s worth getting the rest of the team on board. I look forward to hearing how it goes. Great job again.”

A bit shocked by the whole thing, she messages the Adacado rep to schedule training for her team. A sense of pride and hope comes over her, like she hasn’t felt in a long time. She looks at the clock, it’s 3:40 - she’s worked right through her break. She can smell freshly brewed coffee, and hears friendly chatter coming from the office. It’s 3:40pm on Wednesday. The boss is happy and there’s coffee in the machine. Lynda, you’re on a roll.

Wednesday, 2:44pm. Overcast skies. Lentement Advertising’s coffee machine is out of coffee. The facilities people come on Thursdays to stock the coffee machine. Today is Wednesday.

Lynda has been with Lentement Advertising LLC. for 8 years now. She manages AdOps, reports to the VP of sales, and has a team of 8 working for her. 3 of her team are fairly new, because 3 of her team recently quit. She doesn’t know why. She heard something from HR about workplace culture. To Lynda, free, unlimited coffee is quite the perk - not many workplaces have such a generous culture. The facilities people come on Thursdays to stock the coffee machine. Today is Wednesday.

The company’s numbers are down. Again. Clients seem happy, but campaigns are stagnating and accounts are slowly dropping off.

The CEO has issued an ultimatum to the company; if numbers don’t go back up asap, a ‘restructuring’ will be necessary. That doesn’t sound good.

Her boss messages her that he’s worried about the AdOps team. Things are moving too slowly and accounts are leaving because of it. He’s asked Lynda to review her processes and find a solution to increase productivity and customer satisfaction. She’s been doing this so long that she feels she’s exhausted every possibility; she knows what works, and what doesn’t. It’s the clients’ fault that numbers are down - they’re indecisive and take too long to respond. There’s nothing wrong with what she’s doing, after all…

She checks her email. Questions from her team, messages from HR, emails from disgruntled clients - nothing that needs addressing right away - and one from a company called Adacado. She remembers them, they’re the ones who lost the DELL contract years ago. She deletes the email. DCO? No thanks, not for my clients. They’re happy with what they’ve got. 3:15 - break time.

A week goes by; it’s Wednesday and the coffee machine has run out of coffee again. The phone rings, it’s Adacado. I’ll call them back, she thinks, I have more important things to do. She begins writing a memo to the office manager, requesting larger quantities of coffee beans be loaded into the machine each week. She’ll need to calculate the estimated budget for this official proposal, so she books off the rest of her day to take care of that. Can’t rush the process. Process is everything.

The next week, she receives another email from this person at Adacado wanting to set up a demo. Lynda needs something to report to her boss, so she agrees and books a call. It’s likely a waste of time, but it should make the boss happy.

The call goes fine. It was shorter than expected, and quite easy to follow. But Lynda hates sales people. Now it’s time to draft a report for her boss on why using Adacado’s technology will help them increase profits. But it probably won’t.

She drafts up the basics; who the company is, what they do, how they do it, etc. But she needs cold hard stats. She emails the rep and asks for material to help her make a case for it. It’s 3:15; she turns her computer off and goes to the kitchen-area to get a coffee.

3:29, and she’s meandering back to her desk. She turns her computer on and sees an email from that same Adacado rep. It seems the website has all the information necessary. There’s a series of links to case studies, brands they work with, etc. There’s also a pdf file with all that info in it. That’s better. She can print a pdf file, she can’t print a website. This is advertising; print is better.

She reads through the case studies. ROAS up 2000% - that must be a typo. She writes in 200% - that’s better. NBA, Mercedes, impressive. Sojern - that’s interesting. Lentement has quite a few clients in hospitality… There’s a breakdown of exactly what was done with the Sojern campaign to get such impressive results. 2000 again, maybe it wasn’t a typo? 

The next week (you can’t rush these things, after all) she emails again asking for clarification on pricing. The rep responds with another link to the pricing page, but also a pdf file with the pricing. Perfect. This is alarmingly affordable, she thinks. Some of her smaller clients could actually use this, and maybe they could reduce margins with her bigger clients. No build fees - does that mean happier clients, or just less profit?

In that same email is a link to a blog post titled “How to sell DCO to existing clients with Adacado.” Interesting, that’s exactly what she was considering. Blog posts can be printed, so she prints that too.

She’s finally ready to present her case to the boss, so she books 2 hours with her boss to go over her report. He responds with a short message “Lynda, I don’t have 2 hours to review a 75 page report. Just send me some links to the website, pricing, whatever you think would be helpful. I trust you, I’ll review it myself. We’re all too busy to be spending time on lengthy reports.”

Process! What about process? Biting her lip, she compiles all the links that the rep sent in an unformatted email, and sends it, without even including her signature. That’ll show him.

A few days later she gets a message “Lynda, great work. I think this could be great for us. I looked at their site, and saw how easy it is to get started, how many customer testimonials and stats they have - and that article about how to sell DCO to existing clients! Talk about making it easy for us! No-brainer! Don’t know how you found these guys, but way to go. Get half your team using it right away to if it’s worth getting the rest of the team on board. I look forward to hearing how it goes. Great job again.”

A bit shocked by the whole thing, she messages the Adacado rep to schedule training for her team. A sense of pride and hope comes over her, like she hasn’t felt in a long time. She looks at the clock, it’s 3:40 - she’s worked right through her break. She can smell freshly brewed coffee, and hears friendly chatter coming from the office. It’s 3:40pm on Wednesday. The boss is happy and there’s coffee in the machine. Lynda, you’re on a roll.